Saturday, March 17, 2012

"Breeding, Training, Management, Diseases Of Dogs", by Francis Butler


Bull-Dog

Sullen, morose, unsociable and grim ; Show me the man, who'd dream of trusting him ; With short snub nose, lull, treach'rous glaring eye.

Projecting teeth, small ear and forehead high ; Capacious chest, with muscle, well displayed. The Boxer's bully, and the Tinker's jade ; For them he fights, the scars alone his prize, True to the last, for them, unpitied dies. Exposed his vices, now his merits scan ; The latter real, the former due to man. By nature true, courageous, serious, stern ; Excited oft, his latent passions burn ; Rude urchins, educated in the street, Rowdies genteel, who on the corners meet ; Some men of sense and title too, in fine, Make cruel pastime of this brave Canine. Concealed to view, and worried, day by day, Trained to the Bait, the Battle and the Fray, Inured to hardship, 'reft of every friend, His life's a torment, and a boon his end. Tho' few his social virtues dare to boast, Yet those who know him best, will prize him most ;

While others yap, and yelp and yell, and fly, Carve o'er his grave ; " I conquer or I die.


14 comments:

Anonymous said...

the facebook link doesn't work.

use your url instead of the truth blogs.

https://www.facebook.com/AmericasDog

dawn james said...

so much copying and pasting, i don't know how the pit nutters do it. LOL!

fixed it thanks.

Anonymous said...

Bulldog is a dreadnaught of the canine type constructed by nature in a belligerent mood. - 1916

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1916-01-15/ed-1/seq-6/;words=Bulldog+bulldog+killed+bulldogs+child?date1=1915&rows=20&searchType=advanced&proxdistance=5&state=&date2=1922&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=&andtext=bulldog+kills+child&dateFilterType=yearRange&index=4

dawn james said...

thank you. another anonymous sent me this. i hadn't gotten around to blogging it and then i forgot about. thank you for the reminder.

Anonymous said...

Man laughs at scrawny bulldog.

http://www.artchive.com/web_gallery/T/Tom-Merry/The-British-Bull-Dog-Show-from-St-Stephens-Review-Presentation-Cartoon-25-February-1888.html

Russian general tries to control vicious and crazed bulldog.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZMG5G9HcqRs/TdoN1Upd6UI/AAAAAAAAKUk/P8diSYcx_pI/s400/bulldog.jpg

Anonymous said...

Man portrayed as a lean bulldog standing proudly over a dead lion.

http://www.tara.tcd.ie/bitstream/2262/9468/1/ROB0953.JPG

Anonymous said...

The collar on the lion image says, "property of John Bull."

Anonymous said...

The name John Bull has appeared in two of your images with bulldogs wearing collars that state, "property of John Bull."



John Bull originated in the creation of Dr John Arbuthnot in 1712, and was popularised first by British print makers. Arbuthnot created Bull in his pamphlet Law is a Bottomless Pit (1712)."[2] Originally derided, William Hogarth and other British writers made Bull "a heroic archetype of the freeborn Englishman."[2] Later, the figure of Bull was disseminated overseas by illustrators and writers such as American cartoonist Thomas Nast and Irish writer George Bernard Shaw, author of John Bull's Other Island.

John Bull is a national personification of Britain in general and England in particular,[1] especially in political cartoons and similar graphic works. He is usually depicted as a stout, middle-aged, country dwelling, jolly, matter-of-fact man.

As a literary figure, John Bull is well-intentioned, frustrated, full of common sense, and entirely of native country stock. Unlike Uncle Sam later, he is not a figure of authority but rather a yeoman who prefers his small beer and domestic peace, possessed of neither patriarchal power nor heroic defiance. Arbuthnot provided him with a sister named Peg (Scotland), and a traditional adversary in Louis Baboon (the House of Bourbon[3] in France). Peg continued in pictorial art beyond the 18th century, but the other figures associated with the original tableau dropped away.

Bull is usually portrayed as a stout, portly man in a tailcoat with light-coloured breeches and a top hat which by its shallow crown indicates its middle class identity. During the Georgian period his waistcoat is red and/or his tailcoat is royal blue which, together with his buff or white breeches, can thus refer to a greater or lesser extent to the 'blue and buff' scheme,[2] used by supporters of Whig politics which is part of what John Arbuthnot wished to deride when he invented the character. By the twentieth century however his waistcoat nearly always depicts a Union Flag,[2] and his coat is generally dark blue (but otherwise still echoing the fashions of the Regency period). He also wears a low topper (sometimes called a John Bull topper) on his head and is often accompanied by a bulldog. John Bull has been used in a variety of different ad campaigns over the years, and is a common sight in British editorial cartoons of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Singer David Bowie famously wore a coat worn in the style of Bull.


Political cartoons of of John and his bulldogs.

Popular Indignation or John Bull in a Rage. John Bull bludgeoning a Scott man while his bulldog attacks a banker.

A Growl For Poland John Bull restrains his aggressive bulldog.

John Bull's bulldog tearing a pirate flag

John Bull guarding his pudding with his attentive bulldog

John Bull & his dog Faithful Man leading his leashed bulldog, who seems to be holding part of his leg, with his hooked hand. His other bulldog attacks his wooden leg.

Anonymous said...

Political cartoon of John Bull being baited by several bulldogs representing excise.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsca/07600/07654r.jpg

dawn james said...

these are great anon.



i found this as i was reading about john bull: bulldog drummond

Drummond... has the appearance of an English gentleman: a man who fights hard, plays hard and lives clean... His best friend would not call him good-looking but he possess that cheerful type of ugliness which inspires immediate confidence ... Only his eyes redeem his face. Deep-set and steady, with eyelashes that many women envy, they show him to be a sportsman and an adventurer. Drummond goes outside the law when he feels the ends justify the means.

Anonymous said...

How to Defeat Someone Made Furious by "How to Defeat a Pit Bull with Your Bare Hands"

you might like this satire.

dawn james said...

oh yeah, the stranger is always a hoot. i think that paper enrages more nutters than i dogsbite.org and craven combined.

Meals on Wheels said...

Vintage pit bull poetry, I'm so inspired!

dawn james said...

you will find other vintage poems here too.